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WHAT IS THE BLUE JAY?


The blue jay is known as a trouble making bird. It often travels in noisy family groups and they tend to scare away all of the smaller birds. They eat the eggs and the young babies of other birds and attack the nest by scaring the other birds away by immitating the call of the hawk.



They are found through much of the areas of North America. They grow to an average length of 11 inches in length and their wing span tends to be 16 inches on average. They reach sexual maturity less then 1 year after birth and mate in the spring and summer. They usually net 2 or 3 times a year and usually have 3-7 young in their nest. Their eggs are bluish or cream colored with brown spots on them. Besides eating the young from other smaller birds they eat insects, carrion, fruits and seeds.














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Female birds rarely leave the nest when they have young and the male birds bring all of the food to the nest. They are also known to travel in large flocks scaring away many of their territorially competing birds. They immitate the call of the hawk so well that all other birds cower in fear. They are nonmigratory, meaning they do not fly south for the winter. They are also not afraid of humans and they use our settlements to help expand their territory and area. They also store food for use at other times, much like the squirrel. They also gang up and attack owls that they percieve as a threat to their territory.

 

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